Wednesday, January 27, 2016

The Chateau Outside of Paris (FF)

 ©ceayr
FF - Friday Fictioneers

I was dirt poor all my life.  I slept where I could sleep, I stole what I ate, and I took advantage of whoever I could take advantage of, whoever came my way. 

It was a cold Thursday I chanced upon the chateau outside of Paris with doors unlocked. I ate cheese and caviar, slept on satin sheets, and began taking what I could when the front door opened.

I reached for the nearest lamp, but the family was forgiving. They wanted to sell the chateau provided it go to someone who would truly appreciate it, even if they had to wait for payment til such a person "got on his feet."

In time I paid them, every franc of it. 

Today I have homes outside of New York and Barcelona. But the home I truly appreciate, and always will, is the the chateau outside of Paris.

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For some reason this week I looked at the picture prompt above and didn't come up with anything funny. And for those of you who are thinking "how is that different from every other week?," I'm glad I stuck you with over 140 words to read, serves you right!

What an admirable protagonist we have in this week's story, pulling himself up by his chaussures straps!  Especially as compared to the author, who whines for half an hour if the cable goes down in the middle of a Shameless marathon. You'll sure have nothing to whine about, however, but plenty to appreciate if you check out the work of the other Friday Fictioneers on the weekly prompt by clicking here.

Wish I could put you up in the chateau outside of Paris, but I got it booked through the end of July.  You can't beat Airbnb!

35 comments:

  1. Dear Perry,

    Now there's an operator. I'm wildly ambivalent about him. Nicely done. However, when it comes to word count, you're incorrigible.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

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    1. I suppose there is an ambiguity, but there isn't supposed to be. Our protagonist changed his stripes when he was given an opportunity to own something for his own and obviously made very good for himself after that over time. If I were going to show how he did it, boy, would that word count soar!

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  2. Good story, Perry. My husband met a guy in Dunkin Donuts who found he didn't have enough cash on him to pay for his so my husband treated him as he was a nice guy. When they went outside, the guys big car was parked in the lot. He just never carried much cash. They became friends. He had a lovely big home with a lake on the grounds. Nice guy. Well done even if it wasn't funny. :D --- Suzanne

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    1. It's true, you never know who you're going to meet. If he hadn't been given this opportunity by certain nice people, our protagonist would he dealing drugs and doing whatever else by now. It's not an original concept but that's what struck me here, funny or not.

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  3. Oh but still the first house is the sweatest... Actually when we bought our house we was a buyer who would not mutulate the memories... Good discount really for not tearing the house down :-)

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    1. Some memories ought to be mutilated, hopefully not yours. The first house is the best, it's true, especially if it's the only house.

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  4. I like this a lot, so inspiring and positive. That doesn't mean that I don't like the funny, though. :)

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    1. This is the new me. Next week, we get into macro-economics

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  5. I liked this different approach from you. You're pretty cool at times.

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  6. Half way through this I was "looking for the funny" then realized there wasn't any. A well done switch for you, Perry. I just wonder what he did to get the money if he didn't sell drugs or whatever else one does to get multiple houses. Kudos.

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    1. He was a gigolo, Alicia. You know, a boy toy.

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    2. For some reason this is what I thought of this week. What happened that may not be clear is that he was a changed man because some understanding people gave him the chance to have something of his own. The manner is which he paid for it was legal (whatever it was) and in time he became a successful person who could afford the other houses. If that's not clear, it needs a tweak or two.

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  7. Personally, I thought this was hilarious. The line that really cracked me up was, "I ate cheese." What a riot!
    We all know the chateau is really a cardboard box stuffed under a bridge outside Philadelphia. This is beyond fiction and qualifies as fantasy.
    Now, go eat your cheese, big guy.

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    1. That is the funniest line and how we know this is a complete fiction. And the protagonist is a bit more resourceful than I am as I wouldn't have been able to get over the fence to get into the house.

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  8. truly a rags to riches story. i wonder how he managed to do it. did he murder them later and took away all their money and valuables?

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    1. Everyone's seeing something nefarious here, so I think the story needs tweaking. No, he reformed himself, worked for the money, and later became more successful than he ever would have dreamed.

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  9. nice job.
    you know they say it's an inside job - and your protagonist certainly got inside everything and everyone.
    C'est la vie. C'est whatever.
    C'est Randy.

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    1. And frere Jacques, dormez-vous?
      See, I can keep up!

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  10. Your venture into 'straight' story-telling works well - I actually prefer it!

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  11. Wouldn't that be wonderful? What are my chances this could happen to me when I get to Tuscany?

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    1. Let me think about that. Yes, it's coming to me.
      No Bloody Way!

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  12. Excellent lesson in the story. Man does not live by cheese alone, some accompanying wine and caviar is required.

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    1. You're the first person to nail this exactly. Excellent!

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  13. What a wonderful story! You mean there are some decent out there? Your story filled me hope. Thank you, Perry.

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    1. I am happy to fill you with hope, Amy. Now, let me take it away: no way this will ever happen to us!

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  14. Admittedly, I did wait for a punchline, or tie to Russell's Playboy mansion... but I also like your stab at straight man, Perry. It has a wonderful tone to it, that feels very periodic: 19th century. Nicely done!

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    1. It reminds me of The Bishop's Candlesticks section of Les Miserables. I mean, which I wrote and Victor Hugo copied from me!

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  15. You do appreciate what you earn more than what you are given.

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    1. That's true indeed. Though be given stuff comes in a close second!

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