Friday, January 11, 2013

No One Else to Play Them




As a child he had become so enamored of music that he had them both made especially for him.  And there was no one else to play them.

He played them in high school, college, and local community symphony too.  He played them for friends, neighbors, and almost anyone he knew.  But as grown-up responsibilities took over, he played them less and less until one day in a back closet he simply put them away.  And there was no one else to play them. 

Over the years, he looked at them sadly.  If only he could find the time, but he never did.  And there was no else to play them.

One day he passed away.  The obituary said "World's Tallest Man Dies." 

His set of seven foot tall violins would be donated to a museum, the article said, because there is no one else to play them.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Picture prompt above, story below, 148 words .... that's the sound of this man working on the Fabulous Friday Fictioneers and Benevolent Chain Gang this week of January 11, 2013.

Yep, the words are high at 148  --- well above the prescribed 100 --- but maybe that's what's required for a short story about the world's tallest man.

Anyway, that's my tall story and I'm sticking to it.    I'll try to measure up next week. 

38 comments:

Mary said...

I like your take on the prompt. Well done!

Sandra Crook said...

The repetition on this was quite moving, Perry. Very nicely done, a mixture of pathos and humour.

June O'Hara said...

I'm with Sandra. Nice piece!

debrakristi said...

I didn't see that one coming. Very nice. Sad, but true how so many of us put away the things we love for daily responsibilities.

thebumblefiles said...

Sad at the end, Perry. There really was no one else to play them. There's a kind of sadness, but maybe he enjoyed playing them at some point while he lived.

bridgesareforburning said...

Hi Perry,
A really good "tall tale." Really reaches new heights. You built it up and topped it off nicely. You seem to be able to find levity in almost any topic. Ron

billgncs said...

Perry, this story gives me a heightened sense of appreciation for your work!

Rochelle Wisoff-Fields said...

Dear Perry,
I think this is one of your best. Poignant.
shalom,
Rochelle

theeclecticeccentricshopaholic said...

didn't expect that ending :) a twist and then another twist^^

wmqcolby said...

Hahahahaha! Irononic and SO true. Nailed it, Perry! Good work!

Anne Orchard said...

Maybe Rich's MC could have given it a go ;-) Great tale, even if it grew a little too far. Hope my son doesn't grow this far, though it's looking a bit worrying at the moment.

tedstrutz said...

Excellent story, Perry. Was not expecting that. I liked the part about 'finding the time'... I have a lot of those things I've planned to do, but never will.

Brudberg said...

Great story with a twist. Wonder, was the name Tiny maybe?

Perry Block said...

Thanks, Mary. I sure appreciate your not very contrary take on the post.

Perry Block said...

Thank, Sandra.

Yes, it was a nice mixture but darn it, I forgot to put in the oil and vanilla. Knew the pathos and humor didn't taste quite right!

Perry Block said...

You're with Sandra? Well, I'm with child!

I have no idea what that means.

Perry Block said...

Frankly I didn't see that one coming either. Sometimes when you're stuck for an ending ...

Thanks, Debra!

Perry Block said...

I trust he loved playing them while he lived, and that no one else played them like he did, thereby establishing the dual meaning of the phrase.

Oy, I am sad now. Glad your story was upbeat!

Perry Block said...

Four tall jokes there, Ron, and every one of them worked. You are living proof that size matters!

What a guy, and thanks for writing!

Douglas MacIlroy said...

Dear Perry,

A bittersweet tale and a unique take on the prompt. I liked the use of repetition to underscore the theme. Well done, sir.

Aloha,

Doug

sandraconner said...

A good take on this theme. I liked it very much.

Tom Poet said...

Perry,
I read this the other day and wanted to comment but life gets in the way sometimes. This is one of your best...I forgot that you were going to hit me with a punch line. There was nothing forced about this...You had me going and feeling for this man. Well done!
Tom

kindredspirit23 said...

Enjoyed the story. It caught me off-guard; I love that.
Scott
Mine: http://kindredspirit23.wordpress.com/2013/01/13/cliches-friday-fictioneers-late/

Perry Block said...

Thanks! Hopefully it doesn't take a nose dive next week.

Perry Block said...

Yes, I always strive for poignant. Once I look up what it means, that is.

Thanks, Rochelle!

Perry Block said...

That's nothing. There's another twist at the end of this note to you!

Not really, that's the twist.

Perry Block said...

Thanks! Donna Manners would be proud, I hope.

train-whistle said...

"no one else to play them" great foreshadowing for when we finally learned the truth. this was good.

Perry Block said...

Don't worry, I'm positive your son won't grow this much.

I'm pretty sure, though, that your daughter will! Thanks for writing, Anne.

Perry Block said...

Thanks, Ted. Yes, like I plan to write back to all these comments, but don't get to them until the spring.

Perry Block said...

Nope, he was Tiny's big brother --- Itty Bitty!

Perry Block said...

Thanks, Doug. Yes, when I have no fresh ideas I always go for repetition. Works wonders!

Perry Block said...

Thanks, Sandra. Glad you liked it.

As for me, though, I'm kind of sick of it already!

Perry Block said...

Nothing forced about it? Oh no, then I have failed!

Thanks, Tom.

Perry Block said...

Caught you off guard, eh?

Next time, I'll remember to lift your wallet while doing it!

Perry Block said...

Actually I wasn't foreshadowing so much as trying to figure out what the heck those two instruments actually were!

Thanks for writing.

babaamor said...

Isn't it sad how life gets in the way sometimes?
Well done, Sir.

Abraham

Perry Block said...

Thank you! Isn't it sad how life gets in the way of our writing too?